Tag Archives: news

New: Upcoming Events and CFP

Forthcoming Events
New Ways of Writing History with Patrick Boucheron and Olivette Otele

Institut Français, London. September 20, 2022

The International Trade in Pre-Modern Manuscripts 1890-1945 and the Making of the Middle Ages

Institute of Historical Research, London. September 20–23, 2022

The Mediterranean of Modernity: Global and Regional Perspectives

Funded by: DFG, Forum Transregionale Studien, HISDEMAB, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Leibniz-ZMO, MECAM, and Universität Konstanz.
Berlin. October 4–7, 2022

Online panel discussion: ‘New Histories of Neo Liberalism’
With Professor James Vernon (UC, Berkeley), Professor Muriam Haleh Davis (UC, Santa Cruz), Professor Gary Gerstle (Cambridge), Professor Quinn Slobodian (Wellesley College, MA) and Dr Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite (UCL).

Online. October 13, 2022

Call for Papers
Continuity and Change in Medieval Central Europe (5th Biennial Conference of MECERN)
Medieval Central Europe Research Network (MECERN)

Bratislava, 27.04.2023 – 29.04.2023
Deadline: September 30, 2022

Women Scientists, Development and Environmental Citizenship: Scientific Transnational Organizations and Public Activism
University of Trieste- Department of Humanities

Trieste (Italy),  20–21 April 2023
Deadline: October 15, 2022

Historicizing the Refugee Experience, 17th-21st Centuries

Duisburg, 4–7 July 2023 
Deadline: October 31, 2022

Call for Chapter
Proposals for ‘A Cultural History of Pregnancy and Childbirth: The Age of Enlightenment and the Atlantic System (1765 – 1860)’

Deadline: October 1, 2022

Fellowship
Postdoctoral Research Fellowship “History” 

Centre for History and Economics, Magdalene College, University of Cambridge
Deadline: October 28, 2022

Gallia-Stipendium im Rahmen des Forschungsprojekts “Gallia Pontificia”

Deutsches historisches Institut (DHIP/IHA), Paris
Deadline: December 31, 2022

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Our newsletter is currently edited by Jamie Lee Jenkins, Kye Allen, and Francesco Caprioli.

The Dark Side of the Belle Époque #researchproject #padova

“The Dark Side of the Belle Époque. Political Violence and Armed Associations in Europe before the First World War” is a comparative historical project at the University of Padova and funded by the European Research Council (ERC-Starting Grant Scheme 2015).

The project investigates the role played by militias, paramilitary movements, armed organisations, and vigilante groups before the First World War (from the late 19th century to 1914). It takes into consideration the role, impact, features of armed associations in France, Italy, the United Kingdom, the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the German Reich in order to understand to what extent organised political violence permeated European societies and represented a mass transnational experience in an era – the so-called Belle Époque – which is generally seen as characterised by peace and progress. Actually, the Europe of the so-called Belle Époque was already a continent in which the practice of violence was a daily experience for thousands of civilians.

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Writing politics at Aarhus University #scholarship

“Big news! It is confirmed: We’re on strike in April!” The lovely peace and quietness of the 6th floor’s left wing is abruptly disturbed. For a few weeks now, rumors about Aarhus University being included in the nation-wide strike of the public service workers have been a daily occurrence. With talks between the government and the union(s) deadlocked, the country is now preparing for a major historical event. Apparently, Denmark is not only famous for its ‘hygge’ and its gender-friendly policies: striking turns out to be serious business, too. The stop to work should last not one day or two, but an entire MONTH. In response, the Agency for the Modernisation of Public Administration has issued a lockout notice which applies to the majority of Aarhus University’s employees. In the event of a strike/lockout, my supervising professor here in Aarhus, Hagen Schulz-Forberg, will no longer be allowed to enter the building. But more surprisingly, it could be that even Teresa and I, visiting PhD scholars with no strings attached to Denmark for this matter, will not be able to reach the office. Will what started as dream scholarship turn into a nightmare?

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From national and comparative to transnational histories of reform processes #newbook

Research in the political history of the First World War has mainly focused on the course of events at national levels. It has shown how conflicts between the people’s sacrifices and their political participation led to crises of parliamentary legitimacy. Yet these crises were entangled through the comparative nature of constitutional debates, transnational networks typical of all ideologies, the press and shared war experiences.

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