Category Archives: News archive

New: Call For Papers

For updates on upcoming conferences, call for papers and fellowship opportunities, subscribe to our newsletter here: https://linkedin.us12.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=e5b3a0177d9010092de0be0bd&id=fb74815a84

Call For Papers

Travelling Matters: Rereading, Reshaping, Reusing Objects Across The Mediterranean

Haifa, 8 September 2022
Deadline: April 10, 2022

The Watchful Society: Sexuality, Society, and Vigilance in East-Central and Southeast Europe, 1945–1989

Fischbachau, 17–20 November 2022 
Deadline: April 15, 2022

Kritik der Relationen // aus medienanthropologischer Perspektive

Weimar, 12–14 May 2022 
Deadline: April 21, 2022

Amsterdam as Haven for Religious Refugees in the Early Modern Period

Amsterdam, 11–12 November 2022
Deadline: April 22, 2022

The Queen’s Resources: the lands, revenues, networks, and economic power of premodern royal women

Winchester, 04–06 September 2022
Deadline: April 25, 2022

Courtesy of the Donor: Economic, Political and Social Aspects of Gifts and Endowments to Museums in the 19th Century

Berlin, 29–30 September 2022 
Deadline: May 15, 2022

Microhistories of Socialism and Postsocialism

Pula, 24–27 August 2022 
Deadline: May 15, 2022

Seventh European Congress on World and Global History: Conflict and Inequity, Peace and Justice: Local, Regional, and International Perspectives

The Hague, 29.06.2022–01.07.2022
Deadline: May 31, 2022

We are finding new newsletter editors!

Besides taking care of our monthly newsletter, next month will also see us busy organizing a new workshop for Ph.D. candidates and young researchers in political history. We encourage anyone that wants to take part in and help to develop the potentialities of our network, to get in touch here: phdpolhis@gmail.com 

PhD Course Announcement: Summer School in Global History

Global History today forms a vibrant field of research. It explores how societies in different parts of the world were shaped by global entanglements and reveals that globalization is by no means a new phenomenon but has a history that goes well back until the Early Modern period. It involves historical processes such as European expansion and imperialism on the one hand, but also the ways European societies have been influenced by influx of ideas, raw materials, plants, animals and peoples from other continents. Theoretically, the field has been recently enriched by conceptualizations of for example the Anthropocene or the planetary perspective. To put it short, global history argues that we cannot understand the birth of our contemporary world without historically examining transregional interaction.

Aimed at PhD Candidates at any stage of their research, the 2022 Summer School in Global History is organized by a network of established scholars from the fields of global, imperial and transnational history as well as area studies coming from six leading European research universities (Aarhus, Bern, King’s College London, Oslo, Paris and Tübingen). It will focus on the theme of Transformative Connectivity, i.e. on the transformations that global entanglements provoked in different societies across the globe on the one hand and the ways actors and institutions which established these entanglements were in turn shaped by such processes of globalization.

Key information:

Dates: 08 June 2022 – 11 June 2022

Location: Sandbjerg Gods Sandbjergvej 102, Sønderborg

For more information on the course and how to apply: https://phdcourses.dk/Course/90538

Piracy, Security and the Remaking of the Mediterranean #phdthesis

Our present predicament of omnipresent uncertainty, sudden twists of fate and the sense that a serious menace looms somewhere beyond our reach make it all the more understandable what seafaring people and coastal communities fear most about piracy – both in the present and the past. Like a foreign disease that washes upon the beach, piracy has been such a threatening aspect of life at sea because it appears out of nowhere, unchecked by rules on violence or raiding. A ship appears on the horizon, seemingly friendly at first, but then flags change and a chase on the vast expanses of the high seas begins. In the nineteenth century, piracy on the Mediterranean Sea was, in fact, even considered by some to be a type of plague that had to be fought with unprecedented security measures. As such, the historical repression of piracy touches upon enduringly relevant topics of security, violence, law and the dynamics of international inclusion and exclusion. My dissertation on the nineteenth-century fight against Mediterranean piracy, which I recently defended at Utrecht University, uncovers the dynamics of security during a pivotal moment in history and shows how piracy repression helped remake the Mediterranean into a space of European imperial expansion.

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