Category Archives: Geen categorie

Democracy in the EU: the European ideal as a straitjacket? #phdthesis

It is commonplace in politics, media and academia to portray the European Union (EU) as a technocracy, run by a faceless elite of rule-obsessed busybodies. Scholars and journalists have shown time and again that this image does not account for the member states, for no European laws get passed without them. Yet, the image of the EU as an undemocratic organisation persists, which also raises the question where this leaves the EU’s ‘democratic’ institutions, such as the European Parliament. Why have the institutions which represent popular interests at the European level not been able to fundamentally challenge the technocratic nature of the EU?

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Piracy, Security and the Remaking of the Mediterranean #phdthesis

Our present predicament of omnipresent uncertainty, sudden twists of fate and the sense that a serious menace looms somewhere beyond our reach make it all the more understandable what seafaring people and coastal communities fear most about piracy – both in the present and the past. Like a foreign disease that washes upon the beach, piracy has been such a threatening aspect of life at sea because it appears out of nowhere, unchecked by rules on violence or raiding. A ship appears on the horizon, seemingly friendly at first, but then flags change and a chase on the vast expanses of the high seas begins. In the nineteenth century, piracy on the Mediterranean Sea was, in fact, even considered by some to be a type of plague that had to be fought with unprecedented security measures. As such, the historical repression of piracy touches upon enduringly relevant topics of security, violence, law and the dynamics of international inclusion and exclusion. My dissertation on the nineteenth-century fight against Mediterranean piracy, which I recently defended at Utrecht University, uncovers the dynamics of security during a pivotal moment in history and shows how piracy repression helped remake the Mediterranean into a space of European imperial expansion.

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International APH Conference | 2020 | Call for Papers

Layers and Connections of the Political

11-13 June 2020 | Luiss-Guido Carli University, Rome

This conference has been cancelled due to the circumstances regarding Covid-19.

The Association for Political History warmly thanks the numerous scholars who have participated in the call for panels for the APH 2020 Conference “Layers and Connections of the Political” (11-13 June 2020 – LUISS Guido Carli University, Rome).

Call for Papers

The APH has been contacted by several young scholars asking for the possibility to deliver individual papers. In order to meet these demands, one more session has been added to the Conference, and the deadline for individual applications has been extended to March 31st. This call for papers is open to PhD students and scholars who have completed their PhD within the past five years. Applicants from all countries are welcome.

This session integrates the APH 2020 Conference “Layers and Connections of the Political” and is intended to offer young scholars the opportunity for interdisciplinary cross-fertilization with their peers and with senior scholars attending the APH 2020 conference. Proposals should consider, in a historical perspective, examples of how the multiple layers of the political have connected and interacted with each other during the last three centuries. The call is open to young scholars from all sub-disciplines of history who are interested in presenting scholarly papers on politics. Candidates from the disciplines of political sciences, sociology, psychology and philosophy are also welcome.

Application

Proposals must be sent by the 31st of March 2020 to the email address of the APH 2020 Organization Committee (aph2020@luiss.it) and must include:

  • an abstract (200 words)
  • a short biographic note (100 words)

Proposals will be selected by mid-April 2020 and participation must be confirmed by April 30.

Conference fee

The individual participation fee is 50 euros for PhD students and young scholars belonging to departments attached to the Association for Political History, 100 euros for scholars who hold a PhD and do not belong to departments attached to the APH. The fee is to be paid via credit card to the LUISS School of Government and covers the participation in the conference, the social dinner on June 11 and the lunch on June 12. It does not include the accommodation, for which participants must provide autonomously.

Political History PhD Network | Workshop 2019 Florence | Programme

Identities and Politics throughout History

5th Workshop for PhD Candidates in Political History (second session)

17-18 October 2019
Sala del Torrino, Villa Salviati, Florence

Contact: Laura Borgese – email:  laura.borgese@eui.eu

Organizers

  • Carlos Antolín Rejón (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
  • Ignacio García de Paso García (EUI)
  • Stefano Poggi (EUI)
  • Alessandra Vigo (Università di Padova)

Abstract

Identities are powerful drives in human history. They build the understanding of the world of all human actors, and inevitably affect their actions. Both collective and individual identities are – now as ever – key features of all political activities. The creation and the control of identities are at the heart of all power relations, and as such they have been deeply investigated by human sciences. Indeed, political historians encounter the performative power of identities in most of their research. Nevertheless, they rarely find spaces to debate on identity issues and the tools needed to understand them. The main goal of the Florentine session of the 5th Workshop of the Political History PhD Network is to provide such space.

Since the cultural turn, the constructivist stance has been crucial in historiography. The seminal works of Benedict Anderson and Eric Hobsbawm have questioned ethnical and national identities, while E.P. Thompson with his The making of the English working class has inaugurated the investigation on the construction of class identities. In the meantime, gender studies have shown the cultural nature of gender identities. More recently, studies on personal identification have revealed the close relation between political power and the control of personal identities. In any case, it remains clear that it is not possible to conduct research on political history without questioning the identities used by both the historical actors and the historical observers as ourselves. 

Programme

Thursday, 17 October 

9:00-10:00             Registration and Welcome coffee

10:00-10:15            Welcome by Stefano Poggi and Ignacio Garcìa de Paso

Session 1: Reconfiguring Identities

10:15-12:00     

McCann, Irish clerical communities in Paris and Rome 1770-1830

Braga, “Procura-se viúva de bons costumes”: Women widowhood, identity and property over the Plaquevent, from sexual politics to identity politics in France (1930-1970)

12:15-13:30           Lunch, Canteen

Session 2:              Militant Identities

13:30-15:30           

Castillo, We, who produce, work and pay. The political radicalisation of the propertied classes in Spain and Portugal (1870-1915)

Albornoz, Fascism and Nationalism: The Transnational Construction of a Right-wing Militant in Argentina 50-60

Salo, Weekly newspaper create Italy new right wing identity 1950-1953

Priorielli, The nation in the construction of fascist and Falangist identity?

15:30-16:00          Coffee break, Cloister

16:00-17:00          Keynote speech, Jenny HESTERMANN – Title TBA

19:45                     Dinner

Friday, 18 October

Session 3: Identities and National Building

9:00-11:00            

Avalli, Constructing Italian racial identity: the Etruscan question 20-30

Casales, Reframing Whiteness. The Symbolic Imaginary of Miscegenation in Fascist Italy

Darksen, Disability, Nation-Building and Indigenous Identity in Postcolonial Greenland 1981

Priorielli, Title tba

11:00-11:30            Coffee break, Cloister

Session 4: Diplomacy and Identities

11:30-13:30           

Ciappi, Think tanks, Atlantism, and the construction of Western World identity

Ponte e Sousa, Portuguese foreign policy and change in national identity: Europe and the transition to democracy

Ennas, Ottoman Diplomats characterising Italian populations during the Risorgimento (1848-1870)

Slingerland, Professional and political collective identities show their limitations when patients’ personal identity breaks the gridlock flying European heart patients to the US

13:30-15:00           Lunch

15:00-16:15           Keynote speech by Lucy Riall

16:15-17:00           Concluding Session: The Future of the Political History PhD Network

17:00                     Cocktail

International APH Conference | 2020 | Call for Panels

Layers and Connections of the Political

11-13 June 2020 | Luiss-Guido Carli University, Rome

This conference has been cancelled due to the circumstances regarding Covid-19.

Politics has changed a lot, in the last half-century – and so has political history. The boundaries of the political have been redrawn. The large social and political bodies of the mid-twentieth century have grown weaker or have dissolved. Public institutions have become both less insulated from society and less effective in controlling and guiding it. Therefore, defining what is political has become more difficult. Political historians have confronted this challenge, and in the process have gained a deeper understanding of their object of study, have enlarged their scope and refined their methodologies, and have entered into closer dialogue with the “other” histories and the social sciences.

The fragmentation of the political and the increasing uncertainty of its boundaries have made political historians more acutely aware that politics does not exist only “high up” and on the macro level, but reaches deep into private lives, shapes people’s identities and perceptions, interferes with their thoughts and emotions, regulates and modifies their behaviour. Actions and reactions performed on the micro level can in turn not only determine how initiatives from the top are received, reinterpreted and remoulded, but also condition, constrain and change the institutions and subjects that act on the macro level.

Call for Panels

For its 2020 conference (11-13 June 2020 – Luiss-Guido Carli University, Rome), the Association for Political History invites proposals for panels that consider, in a historical perspective, examples of how the multiple layers of the political have connected and interacted with each other during the last three centuries. We welcome senior researchers, but also encourage PhD candidates to submit proposals and participate in the conference.

Application

Proposals must be sent by the 31st of January 2020 to the email address of the APH 2020 Organization Committee (aph2020@luiss.it) and must include:

  • the description of the panel (1000 words maximum)
  • the abstracts of the individual papers (200 words each)
  • the short biographic notes of the participants (100 words each)

Panels will be composed of maximum of four participants and one discussant

Selection procedure & participation

Panels will be selected by the end of February 2020 and participation must be confirmed by March 15. The deadline for registration and fees is March 31. The individual participation fee is 100 euros for senior scholars and 50 euros for PhD students and scholars belonging to departments attached to the Association for Political History. The fee is to be paid via credit card to the Luiss School of Government. Beside participation in the conference, the fee covers the social dinner on the evening of June 11 and the lunch on June 12.It does not include the accommodation, for which participants must provide autonomously.

Political History PhD Network | Workshop 2019 Report (Jyväskylä)

’Political’ in Political History – Meaning and Understanding of Politics

Workshop Political History PhD Network.
17-19 June 2019, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.

Organisation

This three-day workshop was an initiative of the Political History PhD Network. It was organized by Zachris Haaparinne, Risto-Matti Matero, Jari Parkkinen, Juho Saksholm, and Joonas Tammela (University of Jyväskylä).

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