Category Archives: Geen categorie

Programme | Webinar Sports and Politics | 30 September 2021

Session 1 (15.00-16.55 CEST)

This session will consider different ways of conducting historical research into sports history, both from more ‘top down’ as well a more ‘bottom up’ approaches. Consequently, this session will consider the place of sports history within the broader history discipline and the domain of political history more specifically. Attention will be paid to the types of sources and methodologies that are of interest to the political sports historian as well as the methodological difficulties that one may encounter

  • An Unavoidable Violence. Hunting from the Aristocratic Loisir to the Crisis of a ‘Bloody Sport’ Bruno Farinelli (University of Antwerp)

Since the 1990s, sociology has investigated how societies have developed and implemented the concept of sport. A common theory considers sport as an element in the process of civilisation and the progressive normalisation of violence. Sport has imposed increasingly restrictive rules that have progressively made leisure activities less violent or, in the case of contact sports, a space where violence is controlled. Hunting too has been considered as a leisure activity subject to such processes. Within the evolution of hunting from aristocratic loisir to sport, sociologists and historians have identified a progressive distancing from hunting’s most violent practices. Unlike other ‘sportification’ processes, however, violence cannot be eradicated from hunting. This unavoidable violence raises the question of whether it can be considered a sport at all. The relationship between humans and animals has changed considerably, and today hunting is widely criticised by animal rights activists, with some more radical groups arguing that it should be banned. The roots of these changes and the evolution of hunting practices run much deeper and are entangled with political history. From primitive hunting to noble medieval falconry, from modern chasse à courre to the use of firearms, hunting has undoubtedly been a factor in the civilisation of human society. This paper aims to retrace the evolution of hunting as a leisure activity from the Ancien Régime to the present day, following some specific axes: the evolution of the human-animal relationship, the gender dimension and hunting as a space for politics and diplomacy. Even today, hunting is a practice that is more than just a ‘bloody sport’.

  • Centring from the Margins: Contextualizing Black Canadian Sport History Ornella Nzindukiyimana (St. Francis Xavier University)

Sport history literature emphasizes that cultural practices are always anchored within a political and historical context. Power relations within Western capitalist societies have historically been spread and reified through struggles for equal access to sporting fields. Thus, a history of sport in Canada as seen through the perspective of Black people not only strives to contextualize embodiments of complex socio-cultural and economic forces, but also locates sport within national and international political history. Indeed, to discuss the first Black Canadian Olympian is to conduct a study of immigration policies; to analyse the fighting record of an expatriate Canadian heavyweight boxing champion is to investigate the Interwar erosion of the British Empire’s soft power; to retrace Black women’s integration into sport in the early twentieth century is to extend understandings of social mobility and resistance. These are histories from the margins whose positionality requires strategic interrogation of archives.

  • The sexist rhetoric about women’s inclusion in sport in the 1930s and its resonances in today’s trans-exclusionary policies Clare Tebbutt (Trinity College Dublin)

In the last few years in the US there have been some seventy state bills proposing a ban on trans athletes competing in sports, especially at school level. During the same period, a number of sports governing bodies have proposed a ban on transwomen’s participation, most notably, World Rugby. These moves reflect a broader tendency for transphobia in politics and society in our current moment. These debates about who gets to qualify as a woman for the purposes of women’s sport, are, however, far from new. This paper will draw on media coverage of the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin to explore how sex and gender variance were major sources of concern for organisers. The paper will conclude by considering how the 1930s histories can illuminate the present debates – and vice versa – and what it means to be examining a topic with so much contemporary resonance.

  • Uncovering the Hidden Histories of Women Boxers and Lucha Libre Wrestlers in Mexico Marjolein Van Bavel (University of Antwerp)

Since the 1920s and 1930s, boxing and lucha libre wrestling have become immensely popular within Mexican society. Although women also entered these sporting spectacles as athletes, their stories have remained largely hidden from history. This marginalization at the hands of scholars mirrors and can be partially explained by the fact that women were banned from boxing and wrestling in the Mexican capital for much of the twentieth century. Their prohibition pushed women boxers and wrestlers underground and to the margins of the Mexican Republic, which makes their histories harder to uncover. Placing these women’s histories centre stage provides important insights into the ways in which sporting spectacles intersect with the gendered socio-political ideologies that are expressed within sports environments, legal frameworks, the political ambitions of authority figures and administrations, mass culture, and society as a whole. It sheds light on the multiple and changing socio-cultural believes about Mexican women’s proper social and bodily roles in a broader context of socio-political transformations. It also shows the power of transgressive women to upset conventional gender norms and to bolster historical transformation. This paper will also draw attention to the fact that the method of oral history is especially suitable for recovering the voices and experiences of women that have too often been ignored or discarded by historians in the past.

Session 2 (17.05-19.00 CEST) – The global perspective offered by sports history

Sport being a global phenomenon, this session will ask the question to which degree and in which ways sports history may help to make political history more global.

  • Crossing Boundaries: New Approaches to the Interaction between Sport and Politics in Modern Western European History Harm Kaal (Radboud University)

Although sport is often framed as the ultimate ‘Other’ of politics, it is hard to ignore that the two realms are intimately connected. Yet, historians have scarcely reflected on the nature of this connection in modern Western European history, or on how the politicization of sport has actually taken shape, and how actors and institutions have delineated, navigated and crossed the boundaries separating the two spheres. This presentation tackles these questions through an analysis of three vectors of politicization: political communication, struggles over the use of space, and governance and policy-making. Based on a discussion of recent work at the intersection of political history, sport history, political science, geography and communication studies, the article unearths the relationship between sport and personalized modes of political representation, explores the role of sport spaces as sites of community building and conflict, and considers the instrumentalization of sport in policy schemes of the welfare state. It shows how sport was drawn into the orbit of the state, maps the various actors and institutions at the intersection of sport and politics (ranging from local residents’ groups to international NGOs), and highlights the gendered, exclusionary nature of new popular forms of political communication through sport. All in all, the presentation argues that sport is a highly relevant field to engage with for those interested in the history of political power, representation, communication and governance.

  • Nationality Swapping in the Olympic Field. Cases and Contexts from the Middle East 1998-2016 Gijsbert Oonk (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Nationality swapping in global sports challenges common conceptions of citizenship, belonging and national identity. Athletes who represent a country in which they are not born are increasingly scrutinized and subject of debates among academics, sport legislators, sport federations and in the (international) media. The practice has become so prevalent, that the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) felt obliged to reinforce and tighten their regulations regarding nationality changes. Their efforts were especially targeted towards countries in the Middle East. Our data show, however, that only 13,8 per cent (N=695) of the cases were related to the Middle East. A relatively large numbers of both male and female athletes that obtain passports in Middle Eastern countries come from Africa (especially Kenya). The combination ‘rich oil countries’ and ‘vulnerable African athletes’ may well have triggered the concerns of the IAAF. In fact, this was the reasons why the IAAF started to register passport swaps and regulate them. Nevertheless, World Athletic officials did not highlight the existing nature of college (sport) scholarships in Canada and the USA. Therefore, the practices of Middle Eastern countries in allowing passport swaps should be seen as a challenge to western notions of citizenship and national identity.

  • A global arena? Transnational approaches to public protest against mega sporting events, 1960s to the present Paul Reef (Radboud University)

Large international sporting events are often the object of political histories of sport focusing on nation-building and sports diplomacy by states. This paper shifts the focus to a more bottom-up perspective of how a range of social movements, citizens, and INGOs have contested mega sporting events. Starting in the 1960s, local movements opposed the negative consequences of hosting the Olympic Games, while international sporting events also became a platform for transnational human rights or anti-Apartheid activism. How have these non-state actors politicized sport and projected new political ideals and moral values upon it? And at the same time, how have the organizers of sport events and especially international sport organizations sought to keep sport apart from political contention and deal with opposition? By using sport events as a prism to explore protest from a global angle, sport history can provide a common entry point beyond existing national or disciplinary boundaries. As such, sporting contests are distinct global spaces shaped by different local, national, and international actors, and, crucially, global media attention. Yet there are limits to this global scope: not every country can host mega sporting events, international sporting organizations and INGOs are often dominated by actors from the Global North, and source accessibility and language skills can form obstacles for incorporating local voices in research. Nevertheless, by focusing on popular protest and the dynamics of (de)politicization and governance around mega sporting events, sport history provides both an insightful lens and new perspectives to globalize political history.

  • Title tbc  Susan Brownell (University of Missouri-St. Louis)

Programme | International APH Conference | 14-25 June 2021

“Layers and Connections of the Political”

International Conference of the Association for Political History

14-25 June 2021 – LUISS Guido Carli University Rome, Italy

Politics has changed a lot, in the last half-century – and so has political history. The boundaries of the political have been redrawn. The large social and political bodies of the mid-twentieth century have grown weaker or have dissolved. Public institutions have become both less insulated from society and less effective in controlling and guiding it. Therefore, defining what is political has become more difficult. Political historians have confronted this challenge, and in the process have gained a deeper understanding of their object of study, have enlarged their scope and refined their methodologies, and have entered into closer dialogue with the “other” histories and the social sciences.

The fragmentation of the political and the increasing uncertainty of its boundaries have made political historians more acutely aware that politics does not exist only “high up” and on the macro level, but reaches deep into private lives, shapes people’s identities and perceptions, interferes with their thoughts and emotions, regulates and modifies their behaviour. Actions and reactions performed on the micro level can in turn not only determine how initiatives from the top are received, reinterpreted and remoulded, but also condition, constrain and change the institutions and subjects that act on the macro level.

For its 2020-2021 conference (14-25 June 2021 – LUISS Guido Carli University, Rome, Italy), the Association for Political History presents a program that considers, in a historical perspective, examples of how the multiple layers of the political have connected and interacted with each other during the last three centuries. We welcome senior researchers, but also encourage PhD candidates and young scholars to participate in our conference.

Monday, 14th June

Session 1 – 9.00-10.30 CET (Webex) | Roundtable – Layers and Connections of the Political

Chair: Henk te Velde (Leiden University)

Discussants: Giovanni Orsina (Luiss)

Participants:

  • Hagen Schulz-Forberg (Aarhus University)
  • Marnix Beyen (University of Antwerp)
  • Irene Hermann (University of Geneva)

Session 2 – 10.30-12.00 CET (Webex)  | Panel – Revolution and the language of feelings in Italy: from Mazzini to 1970s terrorism

Chair: Marc Lazar (Sciences Po)

Discussant: Paolo Pombeni (Università di Bologna)

Participants:

  • Arianna Arisi Rota (Università degli Studi di Pavia) | Collateral Effects. Emotional and Material Costs for Political Engagement in Mazzini’s and Garibaldi’s Followers
  • Giovanni Mario Ceci (Università degli studi Roma Tre) | The “True Believers” of the Revolution: Italian Left-wing Terrorists during the Seventies
  • Andrea Guiso (Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza) | “A class struggle fought within ourselves”. War and revolution in the moral world of Italian communists during the early years of the Cold War
  • Elena Papadia (Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza) |Becoming “sovversivi”: how personal suffering and compassion inspire the choice to be a revolutionary

Session 3 – 14.00-16.00 CET (Webex) | APH Forum for young scholars on “Concepts”

Discussants:

  • Hagen Schulz-Forberg (Aarhus University)
  • Henk te Velde (Leiden University)

Participants:

  • Cíntia Martins (FCSH-UNL) and Pedro Ponte e Sousa (FCSH-UNL) | Globalization as process and foreign policy as agency? The agent-structure debate and ‘policy’ versus ‘process’ approaches to the history-globalization nexus
  • Luka Nikolić (Charles University) and Igor Milić (University of Trento) | ‘Frenmity’ as a Political Concept
  • Alessandra Antonella Rita Maglie (UniTo) | Towards a “bourgeois” ethics. Liberalism, conservatism and communitarianism in Deirdre McCloskey’s work

Wednesday, 16th June

Session 4 – 9.00-10.30 CET (Webex) | Panel – The culture of debate in and beyond parliament: a comparison of Britain, Germany and The Netherlands, c. 1870-1990

Chair: Pasi Ihalainen (University of Jyväskylä)

Discussant: Marnix Beyen (University of Antwerp)

Participants:

  • Anne Heyer (Leiden University) | Giving New Meaning to the Rules of the Game? New Political Parties and Parliamentary Debate, 1870-1940
  • Malte Fischer (Humboldt University) | Democracy on Air: The Radio Show “Prominente Zu Gast” and Political Discussion Culture Beyond Parliament, West Germany 1950s-1980
  • Jamie Lee Jenkins (Radboud University) | A “Mirror” up to Society? Popular Expectations of Democracy in the Daily Mirror, 1945-1979
  • Solange Ploeg (Radboud University) | The people’s platform? The voice of the people and its debut on Dutch television, 1960s-1970s

Session 5 – 10.30-12.00 CET (Webex) | Panel – Beyond Traditional Cold War Understanding: Economic and Cultural Elements in East-West Interactions

Chair: Norbert Götz (Södertörn University Stockholm)

Discussant: Mauro Campus (University of Florence)

Participants:

  • Mattia Ravano (The Graduate Institute, Geneva) | Politics through economics: The G7 approach to East-West economic relations, 1975-1989
  • Olga Dubrovina (University of Molise) | International policy in its cultural dimension: from Lenin to Putin
  • Severyan Dyakonov (The Graduate Institute, Geneva) | Soviet Public Diplomacy Campaign of Influencing Indian Politics in the 1960s

Friday, 18th June

Session 6 – 9.00-10.30 CET (Webex) | Panel – Delegitimizing party democracy: Italy as exception or harbinger of change in European democracies (1978-1994)?

Chair: Giovanni Orsina (LUISS)

Discussant: Paolo Mattera (Università degli studi Roma Tre)

Participants:

Lucia Bonfreschi (Università degli studi Roma Tre) | Sawing off the branch they were sitting on: the Radicals and the anti-partitocracy stance

Martin J. Bull (University of Salford) | The Italian Communist Party and the Denouement of the Party System in the Early 1990s

Pepijn Corduwener (Utrecht University) | The PSI and the crisis of party democracy. Transformation, de-ideologization and delegitimation with the Italian socialists, 1978-1992

Gerardo Nicolosi (Università degli Studi di Siena) | The PLI and the crisis of the First Republic. A long-term analysis (1968-1994)

Session 7 – 10.30-12.00 CET (Webex) | Panel – Places of politics in the Kazakh steppes

Chair: Hagen Schulz-Forberg (Aarhus University)

Discussant: TBC

Participants:

Xavier Hallez (EHESS, Paris) | The evolution of Kazakh political structures and practices under Tsarist colonization: studies around the elections in the Semireč’e region (Turkestan, 1868-1917)

Sultangalieva Gulmira (Al Farabi Kazakh National University) | Kazakh nobility of the Russian Empire: civil service, scientific and political life

Tenlik Dalayeva (Abai Kazakh National Pedagogical University) | Management apparatus of Kazakh volosts (1824-1868): from traditional institutions to imperial forms

Shi Yue (Peking University) | The 1822 Statute of Siberian Kirgiz and the Beginning of Russian administrative system in the Kazakh Steppe

Session 8 – 14.00-16.00 CET (Webex) | APH Forum for young scholars on “Institutions”

Discussants:

  • Ido de Haan (Utrecht University)
  • Marc Lazar (Sciences Po)

Participants:

  • Michael Loader (University of Glasgow) | The Shadows of Staraya Ploshad’: The Central Committee apparatus as a Soviet ‘Deep State’    
  • Lorenzo Castellani (LUISS) | Alberto Beneduce, a technocrat in the Fascist era
  • Ermes Antonucci (LUISS) | The expansion of judicial independence in Italy (1948-1978)
  • Cheng Li (University of York) | Jeremy Bentham in the early nineteenth century English law reform politics
  • Adriejan van Veen (Radboud University Nijmegen) | Explaining depoliticization: local civil society as an alternative to politics in the post-revolutionary Netherlands, c1800-1848

Monday, 21st June

Session 9 – 9.00-10.30 CET (Webex) | Panel – ‘Political Participation’ in Democracy History: A Contested and Ever-Changing Concept and Practice?

Chair: Ido de Haan (Utrecht University)

Discussant: TBC

Participants:

  • Anne Heyer (Leiden University) |When did the Masses become Political?
  • Theo Jung (University of Freiburg) | Battling with Words or Fists? Changing Modes of Participation in Political Meetings in Britain and Germany (1867-1914)
  • Carlos Domper Lasús (Universidad de Zaragoza) | The University Work Service. A politicizing experience under Francoism, 1950-1970
  • Zoé Kergomard (German Historical Institute of Paris) | Is electoral abstention also a form of democratic participation? Rethinking the value of voting in the young Vth Republic (1960s-1980s)

Session 10 – 10.30-12.00 CET (Webex) | Panel – Environmental Policies as a Multi-Layered Discursive Phenomenon

Chair: Pasi Ihalainen (University of Jyväskylä)

Discussant: Hagen Schulz-Forberg (University of Aarhus)

Participants:

  • Marij Leenders (Radboud University, Nijmegen) | Green consensus? Ideas about nature and environmental in Christian and right-wing political parties in the Netherlands (1970-nowadays)
  • Jonne Harmsma (Radboud University, Nijmegen) | Dutch environmental debates and the concept of ‘selective growth’: Greening the economy in the 1970s
  • Risto-Matti Matero (University of Jyväskylä) | From companionship with nature to green consumerism: A conceptual analysis of competing beliefs on human nature in Finnish and German green parties 1980-2002
  • Atte Arffman (University of Jyväskylä) | Disasters in the Making: Intermingled Nature of Human and Non-human Agencies in U.S. Disaster Discourses
  • Miina Kaarkoski (University of Jyväskylä) | Evolving political conceptions of the role of armed forces in Finland and Sweden within the context of climate-related conflicts, 2000-2019

Session 11 – 17.30-19.00 CET (Webex) | Panel – Speed date discussion on ongoing research

Please register at aph2020@luiss.it

Discussants:

  • Giovanni Orsina (LUISS)
  • Hagen Schulz-Forberg (Aarhus University)
  • Henk te Velde (Leiden University)
  • Pasi Ihalainen (University of Jyväskylä)
  • Norbert Götz (Södertörn University Stockholm)

Wednesday, 23rd June

Session 12 – 9.00-10.30 CET (Webex) | Panel – The Conservative Party, Conservative Ideology and the Challenge of Change (co-sponsored by the British Political Studies Association Politics and History Specialist Group)

Chair: Giovanni Orsina (LUISS)

Discussant: TBC

Participants:

  • David Jeffery (University of Liverpool) | Analysing patterns of ideological change amongst Conservative MPs and the response of voters: A study of Liverpool
  • Adam Waddingham (University of Manchester) | Cradle of Conservatism? Lancashire, Toryism, and the modern British Conservative Party
  • Andrew Crines (University of Liverpool) | The Rhetorical Construction of Brexit on the Right
  • Tim Heppell (University of Leeds) | Ideology, Leadership and the Conservative Party

Session 13 – 10.30-12.00 CET (Webex) | Panel – The political life of things. Material culture and politics in Risorgimento Italy

Chair: Lucy Riall (European University Institute)

Discussant: Catherine Brice (Paris Est Créteil University)

Participants:

  • Carlotta Sorba (University of Padua) | Revolutionary Fashion. Patriotic bodies in 1848 Italy
  • Ignazio Veca (University of Pisa) | Two popes. Pius IX, religion and the power of objects in Nineteenth-century politics
  • Alessio Petrizzo (University of Padua) | Return to order and material culture. Missing objects, anti-republican narratives and police practices in Rome after 1849
  • Silvia Cavicchioli (University of Turin) | The second life of patriotic objects. Memories and politics from private heritage to the Nation on display

Session 14 – 14.00-16.00 CET (Webex) | APH Forum for young scholars on “Identities”

Discussants:

  • Lucy Riall (European University Institute)
  • Irene Hermann (Université de Genève)

Participants:

  • Andrea Schmidt (University of Pecs) | Reshaped Borders Redefined Identities? Poland, Hungary and the Uncertain Central Europe
  • Konstantin Dragaš (Institute for Balkan Studies) | The Political Ideology of the Risorgimento and the Serbian national movement in XIX century: the similarities and differences of the two political concepts and their heritage
  • Nicola Degli Esposti (LSE) and Angelo Rinaldi (LSE) | The Politics of Peripheral Incorporation: Italy’s Mezzogiorno and Turkey’s Kurdistan
  • Myroslava Lendel (Uzhhorod National University) | Locality and Ethnicity in the Periphery Border Region as the Separate Political Layer

Friday, 25th June

Session 15 – 9.00-10.30 CET (Webex) | Vladislav Zubok’s Keynote speech – Collapse: The Fall of the Soviet Union

Session 16 – 10.30-12.00 CET (Webex) | APH board meeting

Session reserved exclusively for APH board members.

Call for Papers & Panels | International APH Conference | 2021

Layers and Connections of the Political

Annual Conference of the Association for Political History

23-25 June 2021 – LUISS Guido Carli University, Rome, Italy

Politics has changed a lot, in the last half-century – and so has political history. The boundaries of the political have been redrawn. The large social and political bodies of the mid-twentieth century have grown weaker or have dissolved. Public institutions have become both less insulated from society and less effective in controlling and guiding it. Therefore, defining what is political has become more difficult. Political historians have confronted this challenge, and in the process have gained a deeper understanding of their object of study, have enlarged their scope and refined their methodologies, and have entered into closer dialogue with the “other” histories and the social sciences.

The fragmentation of the political and the increasing uncertainty of its boundaries have made political historians more acutely aware that politics does not exist only “high up” and on the macro level, but reaches deep into private lives, shapes people’s identities and perceptions, interferes with their thoughts and emotions, regulates and modifies their behaviour. Actions and reactions performed on the micro level can in turn not only determine how initiatives from the top are received, reinterpreted and remoulded, but also condition, constrain and change the institutions and subjects that act on the macro level.

Call for Panels & Papers

For its 2020-2021 conference (23-25 June 2021 – LUISS Guido Carli University, Rome, Italy), the Association for Political History invites proposals for panels and papers that consider, in a historical perspective, examples of how the multiple layers of the political have connected and interacted with each other during the last three centuries. We welcome senior researchers, but also encourage PhD candidates and young scholars to submit proposals and participate in the conference.

Application

Proposals must be sent by the 31st of January 2021 to the email address of the APH 2020-2021 Organizing Committee (aph2020@luiss.it).

Proposals must include:

  • the description of the panel (1000 words maximum)
  • the abstracts of the individual papers (200 words each)
  • the short biographic notes of the participants (100 words each)

Panels will be composed of maximum of four participants and one discussant

Selection procedure & participation

Proposals will be selected by the end of February 2021 and participation must be confirmed by March 14. The deadline for registration and fees is April 30. The individual participation fee is 100 euros for senior scholars and 50 euros for PhD students and scholars belonging to departments attached to the Association for Political History. The fee is to be paid via credit card to the Luiss School of Government. Besides participation in the conference, the fee covers the social dinner on the evening of June 23 and the lunch on June 24. It does not include the accommodation, for which participants must provide autonomously.

“Nutzen und Nachteil” revisited: what’s the use of Applied History?

Webinar and debate on the opening of the new academic year of the Research School Political History (the Netherlands) with Ido de Haan, Irène Herrmann, Harm Kaal, Jelle van Lottum and Catrien Santing.

25 September 2020, 3.00-4.15 PM

Information: bureau@onderzoekschoolpolitiekegeschiedenis.nl
Registration: email before 23 September to bureau@onderzoekschoolpolitiekegeschiedenis.nl
and you will receive the Zoom link.
Participation is free of charge

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Democracy in the EU: the European ideal as a straitjacket? #phdthesis

It is commonplace in politics, media and academia to portray the European Union (EU) as a technocracy, run by a faceless elite of rule-obsessed busybodies. Scholars and journalists have shown time and again that this image does not account for the member states, for no European laws get passed without them. Yet, the image of the EU as an undemocratic organisation persists, which also raises the question where this leaves the EU’s ‘democratic’ institutions, such as the European Parliament. Why have the institutions which represent popular interests at the European level not been able to fundamentally challenge the technocratic nature of the EU?

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Piracy, Security and the Remaking of the Mediterranean #phdthesis

Our present predicament of omnipresent uncertainty, sudden twists of fate and the sense that a serious menace looms somewhere beyond our reach make it all the more understandable what seafaring people and coastal communities fear most about piracy – both in the present and the past. Like a foreign disease that washes upon the beach, piracy has been such a threatening aspect of life at sea because it appears out of nowhere, unchecked by rules on violence or raiding. A ship appears on the horizon, seemingly friendly at first, but then flags change and a chase on the vast expanses of the high seas begins. In the nineteenth century, piracy on the Mediterranean Sea was, in fact, even considered by some to be a type of plague that had to be fought with unprecedented security measures. As such, the historical repression of piracy touches upon enduringly relevant topics of security, violence, law and the dynamics of international inclusion and exclusion. My dissertation on the nineteenth-century fight against Mediterranean piracy, which I recently defended at Utrecht University, uncovers the dynamics of security during a pivotal moment in history and shows how piracy repression helped remake the Mediterranean into a space of European imperial expansion.

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International APH Conference | 2020 | Call for Papers

Layers and Connections of the Political

11-13 June 2020 | Luiss-Guido Carli University, Rome

This conference has been cancelled due to the circumstances regarding Covid-19.

The Association for Political History warmly thanks the numerous scholars who have participated in the call for panels for the APH 2020 Conference “Layers and Connections of the Political” (11-13 June 2020 – LUISS Guido Carli University, Rome).

Call for Papers

The APH has been contacted by several young scholars asking for the possibility to deliver individual papers. In order to meet these demands, one more session has been added to the Conference, and the deadline for individual applications has been extended to March 31st. This call for papers is open to PhD students and scholars who have completed their PhD within the past five years. Applicants from all countries are welcome.

This session integrates the APH 2020 Conference “Layers and Connections of the Political” and is intended to offer young scholars the opportunity for interdisciplinary cross-fertilization with their peers and with senior scholars attending the APH 2020 conference. Proposals should consider, in a historical perspective, examples of how the multiple layers of the political have connected and interacted with each other during the last three centuries. The call is open to young scholars from all sub-disciplines of history who are interested in presenting scholarly papers on politics. Candidates from the disciplines of political sciences, sociology, psychology and philosophy are also welcome.

Application

Proposals must be sent by the 31st of March 2020 to the email address of the APH 2020 Organization Committee (aph2020@luiss.it) and must include:

  • an abstract (200 words)
  • a short biographic note (100 words)

Proposals will be selected by mid-April 2020 and participation must be confirmed by April 30.

Conference fee

The individual participation fee is 50 euros for PhD students and young scholars belonging to departments attached to the Association for Political History, 100 euros for scholars who hold a PhD and do not belong to departments attached to the APH. The fee is to be paid via credit card to the LUISS School of Government and covers the participation in the conference, the social dinner on June 11 and the lunch on June 12. It does not include the accommodation, for which participants must provide autonomously.