Category Archives: Blog

logoglobalperspectives

Global Perspectives: a new interdisciplinary journal on global questions

University of California Press launches a new journal called Global Perspectives. It is interdisciplinary and at the same time endorses disciplinary roots and routes to tackle larger global questions. For political historians the journal is an opportunity to publish with a leading press, to reach a large, global readership and to make their voices heard by colleagues not only from other countries, but other disciplines as well.  Continue reading

thedarksideofthebelleepoque

The Dark Side of the Belle Époque #researchproject #padova

“The Dark Side of the Belle Époque. Political Violence and Armed Associations in Europe before the First World War” is a comparative historical project at the University of Padova and funded by the European Research Council (ERC-Starting Grant Scheme 2015).

The project investigates the role played by militias, paramilitary movements, armed organisations, and vigilante groups before the First World War (from the late 19th century to 1914). Continue reading

Trip to Kalø. From left to right: Hagen Schulz-Forberg, Marieke Oprel, and Teresa Malice.

Writing politics at Aarhus University #scholarship

“Big news! It is confirmed: We’re on strike in April!” The lovely peace and quietness of the 6th floor’s left wing is abruptly disturbed. For a few weeks now, rumors about Aarhus University being included in the nation-wide strike of the public service workers have been a daily occurrence. With talks between the government and the union(s) deadlocked, the country is now preparing for a major historical event. Continue reading

blogihalainenthespringsofdemocracy2

From national and comparative to transnational histories of reform processes #newbook

Research in the political history of the First World War has mainly focused on the course of events at national levels. It has shown how conflicts between the people’s sacrifices and their political participation led to crises of parliamentary legitimacy. Yet these crises were entangled through the comparative nature of constitutional debates, transnational networks typical of all ideologies, the press and shared war experiences. Continue reading